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Full text of "The Tattler"

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Zhe Zattler 

7952 



Williamsburg High School 
Williamsburg, Massachusetts 




Earl Tonet 



To Mr. Tonet, our faithful companion and 
friend, we affectionately dedicate this issue 
of "The Tattler." For your fine work with 
the basketball team we are all eternally 
grateful. How much better would be the 
worldtoday if we would live by the principles , 
which you inculcate, of good sportsmanship 
and fair play. 




Frances Grinnell 



Barbara J. Troisi 




'TATTLER" STAFF 

Standing left to right: Mary Graves, Alumni; Eugene Penfield, Sports; 
Norman Tiley, Photographer; Elson Hathaway, Photographer; Frank 
Smith, Literary; Richard Purrington, Photographer; Joan Culver, Asst. 
Business Manager; Mary Jane Curtis, Asst. Literary; Julia Kolosewicz, 
Artist; Bruce Purrington, Business Manager; Joan Damon, Artist; Richard 
Houghton, Asst. Business Manager; Mrs. Frances Grinnell, Faculty Ad- 
visor; Edward Merritt, Asst. Business Manager; Nancy Bickford, Asst. 
Editor-in-chief; John Warner, Asst. Business Manager; Miss Barbara J. 
Troisi, Faculty Advisor, Seated at desk: Harry Pomeroy, Editor-in- 
chief. 



CONTENTS 




Faculty- 


3 


Extra Curricular 


27-31 


Seniors 


7-12 


Sports 


32-37 


Write-ups 


13-20 


Pictures 


38-49 


Classes 


21-24 


Hall of Fame 


50 


Literary 


25-26 


Alumni 


51 



Ads 



52-75 




EDITORIAL 



The class of nineteen hundred fifty-two 
has now found its place in past history. 
Most of our school activities are recorded 
in the following pages, and we were fortu- 
nate to be able to include many pictures of 
the whole school year including the last 
nights -- class night and graduation. 

For four years we had looked forward 
to graduation with anticipation, and now we 
have reached the crossroads. Many of us 
are going ahead to forward our education, 
and others are looking for their niche in 
life. With the problems facing the world 
today, none of us are too sure of our futures. 
If the foreign affairs become too acute, we 
shall be asked to come to the aid of our 
country and the liberty-loving countries of 
the world. Not living in secure times , there 
are many problems. The classes which 
graduated before the First and Second 
World Wars had unsteady futures and dis- 
rupted plans. We can only hope that some- 
how, by the grace of God, that bloodshed 
will be averted and the people of the world 
shall live in peace and harmony. 

As the situation is today the best thing 
for anyone to do is to go ahead with his 
future plans as far as he can. May every- 
body's dreams come true! 





Sarah Ruth Adams 

"Sally" 

"Quiet persons are welcome everywhere." 

Historian 4; Forensic 1,2,3,4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; School Paper 3; Freshmen Reception Com- 
mittee 4; D. A. R. Good Citizen 4; Play 4. 





Helen May Baldwin 

"Helen" 
"Neat, not gaudy" 

Chorus 4; Cheerleader 4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior Prom 
Committee 3; School Paper 3; Freshman Reception Committee 
4. 



Jeannine Alice Bernier 
"Bunny" 
" Busy here and there" 

Cheerleader 4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3; School Paper 3; Freshman Reception Committee 4. 





Nancy Isabelle Bickford 
"Red" 
"Nothing endures but personal qualities." 

Historian 2; Chorus 1,2,4; Glee Club 1,4; Pro Merito 3,4; 
Forensic 4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior Prom Committee 
2,3; School Paper 3; " Tattler" Staff 4; Freshman Reception 
Committee 4; Girls' State Representative 3; Play 4. 



Joan May Damon 

"Joanie" 

"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind" 

Secretary 2,3; Chorus 2,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4; Junior Christmas 
Party 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; School Paper 1,2.3; "Tat- 
tler" Staff 2,3,4; Freshman Reception Committee 4; Play 4. 





Elson Willcutt Hathaway 
"Jakie" 
"On argument alone my faith is built." 

Orchestra 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1,2; Glee Club 1; Basketball 1,4; 
Basketball Manager 2; Baseball 1,2,3,4; Junior Christmas 
Party 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; Freshman Reception Com- 
mittee 4; Play 4. 



Richard Wentworth Houghton 

"Rich" 

"It is better to be safe than sorry." 

President 1; Vice-President 2; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,2, 
3,4; Pro Merito 3,4; Forensic 3,4; Basketball 1; Junior Christ- 
mas Party 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; "Tattler" Staff 3,4; 
Freshman Reception Committee 4. 





Ruth Anne McAvoy 
"Syl" 
"Everyone thinks his sack heaviest." 

Orchestra 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,4; Junior 
Christmas Party 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; School Paper 3; 
Freshman Reception Committee 4. 



Edward Howes Merritt 
" Ed" 
"Men of few words are the best men." 

Secretary 4; Treasurer 1,3; Orchestra 2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; 
Glee Club 1,4; Pro Merito 3,4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee 3; "Tattler" Staff 2,4; Freshman Recep- 
tion Committee 4. 





Lois Emeline Mollison 
"Loie" 
"Speech is the index of the mind." 

Chorus 2,3,4; Glee Club 3,4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Freshman Reception Committee 4; Play 
4 



Sylvia Mae Nye 
"Sibbie" 
"A merry heart doeth good like a medicine." 

Orchestra 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Basket- 
ball 2,3; Cheerleader 1,2,3,4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; School Paper 2,3; "Tattler" Staff 4; 
Freshman Reception Committee 4; Play 4. 





Eileen Lorraine O'Brien 
"Muscles" 
"Every why hath a wherefore" 

Chorus 4; Basketball 1,2,3; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Freshman Reception Committee 4; Play 
4. 



10 



Gail Patricia Papineau 
"Frenchie" 
"She's sudden if a thing comes in her head." 

Chorus 1,2,4; Glee Club 1,2,4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; School Paper 3; "Tattler" Staff 3; Fresh- 
man Reception Committee 4. 





Eugene Alfred Penfield 
"Gene" 
"Patience and gentleness is power." 

Vice-President 3,4; Basketball 1,3,4; Basketball Manager 2; 
Baseball 1,3,4; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3; "Tattler" Staff 4; Freshman Reception Committee 
4; Play 4. 



Harry Francis Pomeroy 
"Al" 
"Duty well done is noble." 

President 4; Historian 3; Chorus 1; Glee Club 1; Pro Merito 3, 
4; Forensic 4; Basketball 1,2; Baseball 1,2; Junior Christmas 
Party 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; "Tattler" Staff 3,4; School 
Paper 3; Freshman Reception 4; Boys* State Representative 3; 
Play 3,4. 




11 




Bruce Rollo Purrington 
" Bruno" 
"Progress, --the stride of God!" 
Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1.2,3,4; Pro 
Merito3; Junior Christmas Party 3; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee 3; School Paper 2, 
3; "Tattler" Staff 3,4; Freshman Recep- 
tion Committee 4; Play 3,4. 



Peter Bartlett Shumway 
" Pete" 
" They also serve who only stand and 
wait." 

Basketball 1,3,4; Baseball 1,3,4; Junior 
Christmas Party 3; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Freshman Reception Com- 
mittee 4. 





Norman Jenkins Tiley 

"Slim" 

"Idleness is an appendix to nobility." 

Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior Prom 
Committee 3; Freshman Reception Com- 
mittee 4. 



John Maynard Warner 
" Johnny" 
"Reading maketh a full man." 

President 2,3; Treasurer 4; Historian 1 
Chorus 1,4; Glee Club 1; Pro Merito 3 
Forensic 3,4; Junior Christmas Party 3 
Junior Prom Committee 3; "Tattler" 
Staff 4; Freshman Reception Committee 
4. 




12 



CLASS HISTORY 



A large and noisy class took over Room 6 four 
years ago. Of course, it was the undescribable class 
of 52. We were unused to high school for the first 
few days, but, making ourselves right at home in our 
usual manner, we soon acquainted ourselves with the 
place. The office where Mr. Merritt and Miss Dun- 
phy held forth, we viewed with some alarm, but we 
found that one could get along well with this redoubt- 
able place by avoiding it, and avoid it we did, al- 
though in different ways. Some avoided the office by 
behaving and some by not getting caught. 

We were initiated into full studenthood of Burgy 
High at our Freshman Reception. This event was not 
one to which we wished to go, but one which some 
strong-armed seniors made compulsory. We were 
subjected to some rather obnoxious treatment, but we 
were able to come through. For the rest of that year 
nothing else of too much interest happened to us. We 
had duly elected class officers and had gone through 
the regular functions of the ordinary freshman class. 
We were rather immature and still had a lot to learn 
about pulling "fasties" on the teachers, office, etc, 
but under the willing instruction of the upper class- 
men we progressed in this direction very well. We 
were quite happy when finally we were out of school 
for the summer and cheerfully returned to our homes. 

In the fall we returned from our various towns, 
greeting each other with cries of joy. More experi- 
enced in high school procedure, we felt ourselves 
quite wise this year, but we found out that we were 
not quite so smart as we felt. Indeed, we found out 
that the Greek meaning of Sophomore— wise fool- - 
was really quite true, and that it fitted us quite well. 
We did make fools of ourselves, and quite regularly. 
However, we managed to pull through that year, too, 
and without too many difficulties. We'd lost some of 
the people from our class, and we'd had one activity . 
That was our first experience in badgering people for 
donations, and we've enlarged on that experience un- 
til the end of this year. Our first activity was a card 
party, and we made quite a bit of money on it. 
Looking back, we recall one thing about our card 
party that was exceedingly funny. While five or six 
of us who had been working around and had not join- 
ed a table were having a little game of poker up in 
the back of the room, who should walk in but Miss 
Dunphy. To our mortification she walked right over 
to our table and sat down. Fortunately, we had swept 
the pieces of paper that we had been using for chips 
off the table and were outwardly a picture of proper 
decorum. When Miss Dunphy asked what we" were 
playing, however, I'm afraid that our outward appear- 
ance changed, and we all burst into giggles. Well, 
our first money-raising project was over and we had 
made a profit of about $60, so we looked confidently 
toward our Junior year. 

Our Junior year, ah, that brings back pleasant 
memories, for it was that year that we first really be- 
gan to be a class in every sense of the word. We 
worked, fought, bickered, went to parties, school ac- 
tivities, and everything with a truly class -like spirit. 
It didn't matter much to us if there were petty disa- 
greements; we always came through in the end with 
our goal- -the New York trip- -just a little nearer. 

We put on several food sales. After the food sales 



--ah, that was the fun. Movie parties and rides were 
the general entertainment. One of our more brattish 
ideas of fun after a food sale was to go down to Mr. 
Branch's house and pester him. We had loads of fun 
doing it, even if, once, we almost scared a babysitter 
to death. We made a lot of money on our foodsales, 
but only through hard work on everyone's part. In 
December of that year we put on the annual Junior 
class Christmas party. I think that it was an almost 
unequaled success in parties of the type; everyone had 
a good time. I mention this because everyone in our 
class thought it would be a complete flop, and our 
surprise when it turned out a success was tremendous. 
Our other activity of the year was the Junior Prom. 
We Juniors flocked to the woods and gathered up huge 
armfuls of greens of all descriptions. After returning 
to the school, we attacked the auditorium with all the 
energy we could muster and decorated it, but without 
the customary squabbles. We finally finished, how- 
ever. The prom went off well and everything was in 
keeping with the traditions of the Junior Prom. A 
senior, Jane Smith, was chosen queen and, with her 
court, made a beautiful picture. 

With mingled feelings we watched the class of '51 
graduate. They were leaving Burgy High, and now we 
were the seniors. 

In September of 1951 we returned to Helen E. 
James School, which now was becoming dear to us. 
We cleaned up all duties which faced us and got down 
in earnest to the task of earning money for our trip to 
New York. A food sale, a card party, and the play 
were activities that we put on. This year the play 
was turned from a class play to a school play so that 
a better choice of talent would be available. How- 
ever, the entire proceeds were to be given to the sen- 
ior class. We selected the play "This is the Life". It 
was a comedy and well done by the student cast. 

Finally the day arrived, we were off for New York. 
With our chaperons, Mr. and Mrs. Chester Km it, we 
looked forward to a good time. We took in all the 
sights, the Statue of Liberty, the Museum of Natural 
History, the Empire State Building, Radio City Music 
Hall.Rockerfeller Center, a yacht trip around the is- 
land, the musical comedy show, "Top Banana," all 
these and many more things. We had some very ex- 
citing experiences in New York, some of which 
weren't on the schedule. New York lives by night, 
and we lived right along with it. To our parents we 
owe a great deal, for it really was a wonderful trip. 

Ihave been dwelling upon the fun and frolic of our 
years at Burgy, and perhaps I have given the impres- 
sion that that was all there was to do. Well, that is 
about as far from the truth as anything could be. We 
had a lot of work. There were the usual studies, and 
we all had to struggle along with them. Some spent 
more time on their studies than others, but we all had 
to do some studying. 

That about concludes our History. We are not a 
very spectacular class. We have grown in spirit, 
working and playing together. We are now about to 
go on our separate ways. For only a little while 
longer will we really beaclass.for we are separating 
and leaving high school, but we will remember Burgy 
High, all our friends, and our gay times, and we hope 
that we will be remembered, The Class of 1952. 



13 



CLASS WILL 



We, the Seniors of the class of Nineteen Hundred and Fifty-Two, being physically and mentally enlightened, 

after our adventure in New York, do hereby declare this as our one and only last will and testament, on 

this eighteenth day of June 1952. 

Volume 29 SECTION I 

Article 1 Helen Baldwin leaves her sweet voice to David Heath! 

Article 2 Jeannine Bernier wills her cheer leading pep to Richard Ferreira to help him get around the 
rooms more quickly when he's taking temperature readings. 

Article 3 Nancy Bickford leaves her right to be the only gill in a class of thirteen boys to Barbara Cumm 
which, Nancy feels, Barbara will enjoy. 

Article 4 Our fair lady, Joan Damon, leaves her crown to next year's Junior Prom Queen with this ad- 
vise, "There's a technique!" See Joan. 

Article 5 Richard Houghton leaves with a plea to all able-bodied thinkers to join and support the de- 
bating club next year, and thus help "Burgy" High keep its Forensic Charter, which is the old- 
est one in the state! 

Article 6 Ruth McAvoy leaves her music stand to the orchestra. 

Article 7 To all interested students Edward Merritt leaves the secret to his success: "Look intelligent!" 
As Mr. Ritter says, "He doesn't say much, but he knows it." 

Lois Mollison leaves her rides in a two-tone '48 Mercury to Linda Sanderson- -if she can get 
them! 

Sylvia Nye leaves her skill as a thespian to Paul Harlow, who got a good start in dramatics 
in THIS IS THE LIFE. 

Eileen O'Brien leaves Mr.Ritter's Biology Class. She loves animals in the fresh air but animals 
with formaldehyde distract her. 

Gail Papineau leaves her mid-morning tours around "Burgy" to Barbara Derouin if she is will- 
ing to do office work for the minister. Gail also leaves her love to Mr. Branch. 
Eugene Penfield leaves his athletic ability to Ray Sears with this sage advice, "Forty baskets 
are bound to make the girls swoon." 

Harry Pomeroy leaves his lab experience to Richard Purrington with this'advice, "Don't put 
large pieces of metallic Sodium in H2O; it makes big circles on the ceiling!" 
With his compliments Bruce Purrington leaves his baritone singing voice to Tony Soltys. Now 
Tony can sing with the boys. 

Norman Tiley donates his "vehicle" to Raymond Rice, who, he believes, will soon need a new 
one. 

SECTION II 
John Warner leaves his skill as an author to the English II class so they too will be experienc- 
ed when they become seniors. Miss Troisi thinks experience is the best teacher. 
To all underclassmen the Seniors leave Mr.Ritter's superb?? illustrative stories, knowing that 
they'll get them anyway! 

The Senior Class leaves to the Haydenville students a new bus, one that will stall on the way 
"to" school rather than "from" school. 

Peter Shumway finally tore himself away from his copy of Milton's "On His Blindness" and 
consented to leave it to innocent Juniors. 

SECTION III 

Article 1 In order to spare Mrs. Grinnell's patience, the Seniors leave her one "workable" phonograph. 

Article 2 To Miss Dunphy we leave our sincere appreciation for her guidance and interest in each 
member of our class. 

Article 3 To Mr. Merritt we generously leave nineteen bricks, one for each member of the class, to- 
wards the construction of the new gym. 

Article 4 Her even temperament and ability to remain calm at all times Sally Adams leaves to Mr. 
Tonet, so that he may continue to coach Burgy High teams without fear of nervous break- 
downs. 

Article 5 As a solution for disputes in pronunciation, the Seniors leave Miss Troisi a NEW Merrian-Web- 
ster dictionary. 

Article 6 Elson Hathaway donates his glasses to a worthy cause. He hopes Mr. Branch will now be able 
to read between the lines on the history tests. 

Article 7 To Mr. Ritter we leave a new "biology cat" as the present one isn't what it used to be. 

Article 8 To Mr. Bisbee we leave a robot which will unlock the locker room door so he won't have to 
and thereby spare his good naturedness. 

Signed by the Class of 1952 
Witnessed by 

The metallic Sodium in the lab 
"George and Felix" 



Article 8 
Article 9 



Article 10 



Article 11 
Article 12 
Article 13 



Article 14 



Article 15 



Article 1 
Article 2 



Article 3 



Article 4 



14 



PROPHECY 



I would like to tell you about a unique experience 
I had in the summer of 1955. I was studying to be- 
come an archaeologist- -that is, a person who digs up 
old bones and pyramids- -and my college was taking 
a field trip in Yucatan, getting first-hand informa- 
tion about ancient Mayan life. We had visited some 
ruined temples that day- -August 29th to be exact-- 
and we were going back to the camp for supper. It 
was about five o'clock. We were cutting our way 
through some thick jungle in one of the valleys of the 
Sierra Yucatan mountains near the Guatemalan 
border , when I saw a small animal tangled up in some 
vines and went to aid it. The next thing I knew.i 
was falling through space and found myself in the 
midst of some ancient ruins. After looking around the 
ancient buildings, I learned by the heiroglyphics on 
the wall that they were the remains of a witch doctor's 
college. After rummaging about for some time, I 
came upon a crystal-clear pool with the inscription 
over it " Past , present and future revealed" . At first 
I was bit skeptical, but I said to the pool, "Where is 
Professor White and the class?" Concentric waves 
formed upon the water and when the pool cleared 1 
saw the professor back in camp. He didn't seem to 
notice my absence, however. After seeing the pre- 
sent appear, 1 asked the pool to bring me back to the 
Junior Prom of 1952. Again the waves formed, and 
the water cleared, I saw myself dancing with my date 
on that eventful evening. Then I wondered if I could 
pick up the future on this great, great grandfather to 
the television set. Out of sheer curiosity 1 asked 
what EDWARD MERRITT would be doing in 1967. 

The water rippled again, and when it calmed down 
there was Eddie with his head buried in his hands, sit- 
ting on the porch of an ultra-modern house in Lithia. 
He was mumbling something to himself. When I ask- 
ed the pool for some sound, I heard, from out of no- 
where, Eddie's voice. Whathewas saying went some- 
thing like this: "What a mess. Here I am, one of the 
top conservation experts in the country and I can't 
understand what happened." 

It seems that Eddie had a new idea for conserva- 
tion farming and he tried it out on his farm, but a 
heavy rain came along and washed all his top soil 
down the Westfield River. However, I knew that Ed- 
die would work things out for the best, as he always 
did. 

Next I asked to see what EILEEN O'BRIEN would be 
doing in 1967. When the water cleared, there was 
Eileen in a gorgeous gown powdering her nose before 
a mirror. She was in a Roxy dressing room, for she 
was making a personal appearance there direct from 
Hollywood. Eileen had become a very famous movie 
star since leaving Burgy High, and she was talking to 
her wardrobe mistress. It seemed that there was a 
party atthe Waldorf -Astoria, and Eileen was besieged 
by invitations from several of her many suitors. Not 
knowing which one to accept, she was greatly disturb- 
ed. Just then the telephone rang. It was JOHN WAR- 
NER, and wanted Eileen to go to the same party with 
him. When she learned that the party was in his hon- 
or, she accepted. They arrived at the Waldorf at 
midnight just when the party was getting started. 



While they danced, John told her all about himself. 
He had come to New York in '64 and published a book 
based on the happenings in Williamsburg High School 
while he was there. It reached the best seller list 
overnight and was proclaimed one of the funniest 
books in the history of literature. Since then he had 
written a few more books and had been living off his 
royalties. John and Eileen left the party at 4 A. M. 
(A good thing Eileen's father wasn't around- -such an 
hour!) I left them at this point, for three is a crowd, 
they say, and asked the pool to show me what RICH- 
ARD HOUGHTON would be doing in the same year. 

The ripples formed and cleared and I saw in front 
of me Richard's house in Chesterfield, but it was sur- 
rounded by a high-voltage electric fence. There were 
several armed guards at the entrance. A huge sign 
proclaimed, "Warning - Danger - Keep Out - United 
States Government Inter -Planetary Space Ship Test- 
ing Grounds". Then I saw Houghton, standing by a 
huge rocket ship which must have been 150 feet high. 
Just then a door slowly opened on the ship, and BRUCE 
PURRINGTON and EUGENE PENFIELD came down the 
rampway. "Bruno" called down to ask Houghton if 
everything was ready for the trip to the moon, and 
Houghton replied everything was, but he wanted to 
check his computations again. Bruno looked as if he'd 
explode, but he calmed himself and argued that it 
would take five hours to calculate it even by using 
Purrington's invention: the electric slide rule. By 
then it would be too late to launch the rocket and 
they would have to wait until next month before the 
launching. While they argued, Penfield listened and 
then softly said, "Shut up." He added that he was 
tired of kissing his wife and his family good-bye 
every month and then having to return home because 
of Houghton's last minute check-ups. Either they 
would take off for the moon now or they would have 
to find a new pilot. Houghton gave in, reluctantly, 
and all three climbed into the rocket ship. After a 
minute there was a huge blast and the rocket took off 
for the moon. 

I breathed a sigh of relief after all the tension and 
asked where SYLVIA NYE would be in 1967. When I 
looked into the pool there was Sylvia, a ballerina, 
dancing the "Dying Swan" before a full house at the 
Metropolitan Opera House in New York City. When 
she finished, the audience went mad with applause. 
After many bows, Sylvia returned to her dressing 
room which was packed full with flowers. Sylvia 
asked her maid to get the manager and when he came 
she complained to him about the music. "Everything 
goes well," said Sylvia, "until the very end when 
there is that accordionist's solo. It ruins my dance 
and the whole mood. I never heard of such a thing. 
Fire her!" The manager said he could not do that 
because the accordionist was the best in the country, 
in the world! The manager thought that if Sylvia 
spoke to her they might be able to work out a com- 
promise. Sylvia consented, and the accordionist was 
brought in. I was surprised to see RUTH ANNE Mc- 
AVOY enter. Sylvia was taken back too, but she re- 
gained her composure quickly. She said that she 
wished to tell Ruth how much she liked the music and 



15 



how well it went with the mood of her dance. They 
then talked of old times and Ruth told her how she 
had risen to fame the hard way since leaving Burgy 
High and how she finally had reached the top. I saw 
that they would be talking for hours, so I asked the 
pool what JOAN DAMON would be doing in that year. 

Joan was facing a class of bright, smiling, and 
noisy children. She was in Room 4 of the Helen E. 
James School. She was instructing the class to be 
quiet, for there was to be a visitor to speak to them. 
When the class quieted down, she went out into the 
hall and brought SALLY ADAMS into the classroom. 
Sally, it turned out, was a geologist and told the class 
about a trip she had recently made to the Union of 
South Africa. Also, she showed them a huge dia- 
mond, larger than the Hope Diamond, that she found 
while there. After the talk she and Joan chatted 
while they ate lunch in the teacher's room. Joan 
asked Sally if she was going to the town meeting that 
night to vote for a gymnasium for the high school. 
Joan was one of the 120 members of the fact-finding 
board, formed to look into the matter of the new 
gymnasium. The same old problems, I thought, as I 
asked to see NORMAN TILEY'S future activities. 

Norman was strolling down a long hall in an office 
building. He stopped in front of a door marked, "Bu- 
reau of Internal Revenue, Main Office, Wash. D. C." 
He went up to a desk, and who was behind it but- 
ELSON HATHAWAY! Norm asked Jake what was the 
idea of the subpeona? Jake answered that Norm 
hadn't paid the tax on the jet-engine cars that he 
manufactured and which was due March 15th; here it 
was the middle of June. Angrily Norm threatened to 
call his lawyer and carried out his threat, but on a 
public 'phone. Jake wouldn't permit Norm to use 
the government's 'phone because the expense was an 
unnecessary spending of the tax -payer's money for 
business of a personal nature. Norm's lawyer arrived 
about ten minutes later, and it was none other than 
NANCY BICKFORD. They fought for a while, and 
Norm finally said that he would pay the tax rather 
than go to jail. Then after tension had relaxed Nor- 
man and Nancy said it was good to see Jake again 
and that they hardly ever saw the old gang. Jake said 
that he had a couple of surprises and led them to the 
Office of the Secretary of State. There was HELEN 
BALDWIN, a private secretary to the Secretary of 
State. She said she had gotten the job simply be- 
cause her husband was none other than the Secretary 
of State. Then Jake took Norm, Nancy, and Helen 
to the Treasury Building, where entering an office, 
they found JEANNINE BERINER operating a compto- 
meter. Hardly taking her eyes off the machine, she 
told them that she was figuring up the national debt. 
While they were talking, a bell rang anncjncing 
lunch hour, and all five went out to eat. As I did not 
want to see people eating- -I was almost starving my- 
self- -I asked to see what GAIL PAPINEAU would be 
doing. 

I saw Gail working in a laboratory which contain- 
ed Guinea pigs, rabbits and other animals. An as- 
tonished look came over her face when she looked 



into her microscope. Then she pressed a button on 
her desk, and LOIS MOLLISON came running in. It 
seems that Gail had discovered a sweet tasting medi- 
cine that would take the place of castor oil and that 
would be twice as effective. Lois was Gail's assistant 
and had helped in this great new discovery. The rea- 
son for looking for a substitute for good old castor oil 
was that Gail and Lois had a hard time feeding that 
horrible tasting stuff to their children (a total of 
twelve or six apiece) and thought they would try to 
make a mother's work a little lighter. I knew now 
that scientific progress could not be stopped. 

Well, that takes care of the class, I thought to my- 
self. But wait, I had forgotten one person, PETER 
SHUMWAY. In the pool I saw Peter on his farm on 
the Ashfield road. The farm had changed somewhat, 
with new buildings and with a strange kind of animal. 
It seems that Peter was a veterinarian, but in his 
spare time he busiedhimself experimenting by cross- 
breeding animals, and this hybrid in front of me was 
one of his new specimens. He called it a co-raffe, a 
cross between a cow and a giraffe. This animal was 
a help to the farmer for if all the grass was dry or 
eaten up, the co-raffe would simply raise its long 
neck and eat the leaves from the tree. Also, in the 
winter time it saved the farmer a great deal of work 
because the farmer did not have to throw down the 
hay from the hay-loft, but just simply let the co-raffe 
stick its head up from downstairs and eat to his heart's 
content. Also, because of the co-raffe's long legs the 
farmer saved a lot of stooping and bending during 
milking time. Yes, Peter really had bred a wonder- 
ful animal! 

Just then I became curious to see what I would be 
doing, but before an image could form on the pool 
Professor White and the class discovered me. I show- 
ed Professor White the pool, but no image appeared 
when I asked it to. He thought I was affected by sun- 
stroke. He had me rest for a couple of days, and when 
I still insisted on my story of the magic pool, sent me 
away for a longer rest. When this period was up, I 
told the graduates of '52 their various futures, which 
I had seen in the pool. They, too did not believe me. 
Alas, nobody believes me, but you, ladies and gentle- 
men, you do believe me, don't you? 



16 



PROPHECY ON THE PROPHET 



The train joggled and bounced along, as my 
troubled mind joggled and bounced right along with 
it. It was the confusing year of 1970 and I needed a 
rest; thus, I was traveling westward for sunshine and 
desert air. My psychologist has just told me that with 
the proper care those visions I saw now and then would 
soon vanish. 

My eyes watched the western scenes as they flew 
by. Small villages, cattle roaming prairies, gradua- 
tion at W. H. S., 1952. What? It couldn't be! ! ! It 
must be another vision I looked anxiously about at 
my fellow travelers. They didn't seem to notice any- 
thing strange. I cautiously brought my eyes back to 
the window. There it was again! Graduation, W. H. 
S., 1952. Our class president, the honorable Harry 
Pomeroy was descending from the platform after hav- 
ing received his diploma. I couldn't help but wonder 
what had happened to Harry since that fateful June 
19, 1952, as I hadn't seen him since then. 

At that point an ice cream vender came peddling 
his wares down the aisle, and unable to resist a choco- 
late-pop I drew my eyes away from the window for 
a moment to make my purchase. As I again made 
myself comfortable, I looked once again out the win- 
dow. Oh no! ! ! Harry took that business about go- 
ing to college in the West a little too seriously. It 
was the summerof 1956 and Harry was standing in the 
center of an Indian village, as the young Indian 
maidens danced around him declaring him their 
Chief Choo-Choo-Woo-Woo-Oh-You-Kid-Pomeroy. 
Harry, what have you done? I peered anxiously into 



the window, striving to see what had happened to 
Chief -Choo-Choo-Woo-Woo -Oh- You- Kid-Pomeroy 
after graduation from college. But, zoop, the train 
emerged into a tunnel and I could see nothing but an 
occasional lantern which lit the tunnel at fifty foot 
intervals. 

Upon leaving the tunnel I once again gazed at the 
sights in my window. But, where was Harry? 
Ooops!!! Did I say where was Harry? Harry was high! 
Yes, I said high. It was June 19,1967 and Chief Choo- 
Choo-Woo-Woo-Oh-You-Kid-Pomeroy had just set 
the world's record for flag pole sitting. He began to 
shimmy down the pole, but I could watch no more. 
To think that the class of 52's Honorable President 
Harry Pomeroy's only success in life was that of a 
flag pole sitter was more than my tired brain could 
cope with. But, perhaps these were visions, such as I 
had seen back east. I was consoled somewhat by that 
thought. Still, my mind was troubled. 

Soon I reached my destination, Hollywood, Cali- 
fornia. I dressed carefully that evening, for I had a 
ticket (which I received through connections) for the 
Annual Convention of Important People. They were 
to announce the Man of the Year. When I arrived at 
the conference the announcer, a chap named Norman 
Tiley, was making the introductions: 

"And now ladies and gentlemen, that congenial 
man with the ladies, the top scientist of our time, 
that archeologist who looks for young, as well as 
old bones, Mr. Chief Choo-Choo-Woo-Woo-Oh- 
You- Kid-Pomeroy, MAN OF THE YEAR." 



17 






Most 

BUSINESSLIKE. 



THE ONE WHO 
DID MOST FOR 
BURSHY 





I 




Most Petite 




Bot 6IRL 

Best dancers 



Quietest 





Man-hater 




CLASS 
artist 



CUSS Wit 




Best dressed Boy 



18 




PopuLM? Girl Woman-hater 




Most Likely to 
Succeed 






Noisiest 



BEST LOO KINS * ATHLETE 






Courteous 
Best actress and actor Best n atured 



19 



GRINDS 



Greetings and salutations from the class of '52 
We're a happy-go-lucky and carefree crew. 
Our motto we follow and help people out, 
So just be like us with never a doubt. 

Our star athlete of the year was Elson Hathaway; 
When Jake stepped up he was the star of the day, 
But when the game was over, on the bleachers he sat, 
Because the fans all knew what happened "when Casey 
went to bat." 

Richard Houghton is a happy, but slow -moving male 
Who certainly believes in the turtle and hare tale, 
So why rush around and be always in haste; 
Let's try to remember "Haste makes waste!" 

Up in the hills there is a small farm; 
Where corn and weeds grow behind the red barn. 
Here's where Edward Merritt wearily toils, 
Developing 4-H projects in all of the soils. 

Eugene Penfiold is a handsome young lad, 
And "cherchez la femme" is his only fad. 
He'll linger wherever there's blue eyes and curls 
With "Here I am, you lucky, lucky girls!" 

Harry Pomeroy drives up in his black limousine 
He has no chauffeur, but a mechanic is seen. 
Repairs run high, and much money he pays; 
The old Buick has seen its better days. 

What do we see here? Gaze thru that door-- 
A young man is surrounded by girls galore. 
Of course, it's Bruce Purrington, our business man. 
Demonstrating at a brush party as best he can. 

When all is quiet on the Western front 

Peter Shumway comes up with another stunt. 

His many jests we hear through the day, 

As he does not believe in all work and no play. 

"My hot-rod is ready and raring to go, 
But mind you. Brother, it won't go slow." 
This is Norman Tiley's bid to all 
Who are daring enough to answer his call. 

The votes are collected and the tallies then show 
They are eighteen for "yes" and just one "no". 
John Warner is known to never agree. 
But with no arguments, what a dull world this would 
be! 

There are just nine boys, but we think they're all 

right. 
And this concludes my half of the grinds for tonight. 
Bruce Purrington will now take over from here 
With the ten Senior girls who on his list will appear. 

Room six, room four, room two, room one. 
You see at last we all have won 
The griefs, the joys, the sorrows and delights, 
The Honor, and Glory of these last nights. 

I dedicate these grinds to you girls 

With smiling lips and shining curls. 

Who worked your way through thick and thin 

From Frosh to Grads with woes and grins. 



I take for that first girl of mine, 
The one who never was on time, 
But this wise girl has caught her boy; 
You know, I mean Ruth McAvoy. 

Her hair of red, her eyes of blue. 
Her contagious laugh, and giggling, too. 
All show that Sylvia's fond of wit, 
For ever and always she's been in a fit. 

So busy, so small, so blond is Jeannine, 
Her lips with a smile, her eyes with a gleam. 
A good Commercial student is she; 
Some day a prize typist she will be. 

She's sometimes sad, and she's sometimes gay. 
And walks away with most every A. 
She's fond of music and fond of glads. 
And Nancy Bickford likes all the lads. 

She's jolly, and happy, and a bride-to-be; 
It's Lois who's friendly with bright gaiety. 
Oh, dear girl how would it be 
Without your laugh at each party? 

Dark and pretty and very -well dressed 
From head to foot, she does her best 
To look and be a fashion show. 
You all have guessed -it's Gail Papineau! 

A huff and a puff, one minute to nine. 
Yet always and ever she's been on time. 
Debating she does, and sincere is she. 
And Sally's quite fond of geology. 

From way up there in Worthington, 
We get a typist full of fun. 
And to each dance she always goes; 
Miss Helen Baldwin likes short beaux. 

In business courses she is a whiz, 
She tops the class in most every quiz. 
An argument is her chief delight. 
Eileen kept Oscar always in sight. 

Joan is last, but not least, by far; 
Artistic, likes sports, and was our Prom star; 
Children she loves; a teacher she'll be; 
She's a favorite of all; on that we'll agree. 

And now you know, and all have seen 
The secrets and features of all nineteen. 
And so I say to you "bon soir" . 

You've been a good audience, and now, "au revoir"; 
"Au revoir" to our school, so friendly and warm-, 
"Au revoir" to you people who've heard us perform; 
"Au revoir" to our teachers who taught us a great deal; 
Believe us, we can't tell you how we all feel. 



20 



/ / 





-^ X 




JUNIORS 



First row, left to right: Nancy Outhuse. Frank Smith, Joan Culver, Ramon Sears, Karyl Ronka, Richard 
Ferreira. Second row: Mary Graves, David Heath, James Johnson, Richard Pierce, Raymond Rice, Julia 
Kolosewicz. Third row: Barbara Derouin, Jean Tiley, Richard Purrington, Sidney Nichols, Mary Jane 
Curtis, Janice Richardson. 



FACES 

Here is our picture 
take a good look, 
These faces you'll see 
in next year's book. 

Then when you see us 
all seniors we'll be 
just looking forward 
to June '"53." 

Julia Kolosewicz 



22 




SOPHOMORES 



First row, left to right: Helen Sroczyk, Anne Ice, Robert Bisbee, Bernard Bachand, Jane Beals, Ellen 
Ames. Second row: Yvonne Dufresne, Constance Packard, Sondra Black, Lucy Mathers, Nancy Brew- 
er, Barbara Cumm, Patricia Evans. Third row: Mary Smart, Norman Stone, William Hurley, Willard 
Thayer, William Hayden, Carole Harlow, Antony Soltys. 



Another year we're leaving behind 

A year that was spent improving our minds. 

We are the class of '54 

We will be here for two years more. 

We prepare for the future which seems far away, 
But when we look back, may seem but a day. 

Ball games, dances, and parties- -they all were fun. 
Two more years and our high school days are done. 

Jane Beals 



23 




FRESHMEN 



First row, left to right: Marilyn Pearl, Janet Vayda, Alice LaCass, Larry Sherk, Paul Harlow, Beverly 
Richardson, Alison Sharpe, Alice Nugent. Second row: Jacqueline Morin, Linda Sanderson, Donna Shum- 
way, Nancy Curtis, Mary Baker, Gail Gridley, Dorothy Hillenbrand. Third row: Rolfe Bryant, James 
Evans, Alexander Ferreira, Bruce Peavey, John Dymerski. 



Freshman Class 
As freshman it was pretty hard, 
But now we'll say good-by. 
For next year, we hope to be, 
Sophomores at Burgy High. 

This year has been a happy one; 
We've had our hardships too. 
But when we're through and say good-by, 
We'll remember this grand old crew. 

We'll leave our room all neat and clean, 
For the next class to arrive. 
But of all classes in years to come, 
There will be none like '55. 

Alison J. Sharpe 



24 



LITERARY 



BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

The small school basketball tournament will celebrate its Silver Jubilee this year. This tournament is 
carried on each year by the University of Massachusetts in the Curry Hicks physical education cage, and orig- 
inated with Harold M. (Kid) Gore. 

This tournament has become very popular around this area and is quite different from other tournaments, 
because it is an event that stresses fair play rather than championships. Each year teams are chosen to par- 
ticipate in the tourney for the good clean game they play, rather than for the records they have achieved. 

The selection committee, which chooses the teams that are to play in the tourney, watches each team in 
the area and the way they conduct themselves during competition. As these teams are chosen before their 
future records have been made, their good showings are merely coincidental. 

It gives the small schools a chance to show their ability on a large court that they do not have during the 
regular season, and fans and players alike look forward to this event. 

Sportsmanship has been the feature of the tournament duringits entire history and everyone sees hard-fought 
but cleanly played contests. This tournament grows bigger each year because of the manner in which it is 
conducted. 

Most of us have heard this verse: 

"When the One Great Scorer comes 
To write against your name. 
He cares not what you've won or lost 
But how you've played the game." 
This is a good verse for all of us to live by whether at work or play and certainly applies to this tournament. 

In sports and games it is easy to be a good sport when you are on the winning side, but sometimes it is not 
so easy when you are losing. If you are a member of a team, show team spirit and remember that each mem- 
ber of a team is an important part, however small that part may be. Be a good sport even though you play a 
small part. That you have played a good fair game is what really matters. Everyone admires the team who 
keeps smiling in spite of their losses. 

Small high schools cannot help but gain a great deal of good from these tournaments. That they are pick- 
ed to play for their fine sportsmanship in competitive games, is an honor to the school and players alike, as 
well as to the town. The young boy who learns to play a good clean game of basketball in high school will go 
on to do so in college. 

Good sportsmanship is also necessary for becoming a good citizen, and one cannot learn too early to achieve 
it. Playing on and being part of a team is a good experience in learning good sportsmanship. Everyone should 
remember the way in which a team plays the game, not how many points they score. That is what has made 
this small high school basketball tournament as interesting and successful as it is. May it continue for twenty- 
five more years! 

Jean Tiley '53 

THE DROWNED FRIGATE 

From my bed in the shifting sand I can see brightly colored tropical fish flash by in the murky depths of the 
Caribbean Sea, chase by larger fish who in turn are being pursued by their more vicious enemies; kill and be 
killed seems to be the motto of this undersea world. In my hold lurks an octopus, preying on the more in- 
quisitive denizens of the deep who venture into his lair by some unfortunate stroke of luck. Such is my pre- 
sent state, fish swimming through the holes and cracks in my uncaulked, heeled-over body. Once upon a 
bloody, war-infested time, I was a proud ship captained by brave men and serving a rather dull existence as 
a merchant vessel; but as happened to most of my kind, 1 was captured by pirates who, in a bloody battle, 
tore gaping holes in my heaving sides with cannon, ripped my deck and rails with grappling hooks and swords, 
and killed my crew. My billowing sheets were torn by shots, and then ripped from splintered masts which 
later split and were shot off by the pirate cannon. The defeat of my crew was disastrous, and the small number 
of men left alive on my decks was pitiful indeed. 

After this ignominious defeat, I was led to a small inlet on an uncharted-uninhabited island and careened. 
Holes were patched, my keel and bottom timbers caulked, tarred, and warped; new masts were raised on my 
deck, and the remnants of the short stumps which were all that remained of my original masts were ripped 
off my pain racked chest and thrown into the sea. When I was again seaworthy, a prize crew took up quarters 
below decks. 

One dark, sultry, tropical night the crew awoke me from a troubled sleep in my rolling, tossing bed; orders 
sent from the captain of the pirate ship were sending us on a misson to capture a gold-laden Spanish galleon. 

As we neared our objective, little ant-like figures could be seen scurrying about on the decks of the ship. 
Suddenly a searing pain shot through my side; the little men had been busy loading their guns, and now that 
they had found their range, the battle had begun in earnest. The small, inadequate prize crew on my fore- 
deck was helpless agains the vicious onslaught of the Spaniards. Another shot soon found its home below my 
water line. The sea swirled into my hold and its gurgling whispered that it would soon swallow me, clutching 
me to its sandy floor. 

And so my story ends; if you look closely at my long, once streamlined prow, you will see that my name 
has long been covered by barnacles. One would never be able to tell that I was once the proud frigate, "Maid 
of Jamaica" . Perhaps this sad end was destined to be so; my name had thirteen letters in it, which to the 
superstitious sailor, meant that bad luck befill anyone who sailed on me. Once a spirited crew piled on my 
sail, sending me skimming over the waves sparkling in the sun, the flying fish leaping up through the sea to 
escort me to my destination; but now my only captain is an octopus, and my crew is a school of bright, care- 
free fish. 

Karyl Ronka'53 

25 



FENCES 

Have you ever given a thought to how odd our countrysides would look if we had no fences? 

On the prairies, where fences are used to mark land boundaries and to hem in herds of longhorns, your view 
of the flats would be incomplete and barren without dozens of fences crossing and recrossing each other every 
few acres. 

In New England your stone fences and wooden rails add atmosphere to picturesque surroundings, and in cities 
high wooden fences hide a multitude of sins. There they are used to better the appearance of the unsightly 
places such as cluttered alleys, and dirty tenement yards by hiding them. 

There are two types of fences which are hated immensely. The high fence surrounding the baseball park 
is a hated obstacle in the life of a poor baseball fan, but it of course serves to make more people pay to see 
the game, and it provides a place to paste advertisements, both a help to the park manager. The fence sur- 
rounding the State prison is also a nuisance in the mind of the escape artist, but it, too, saves society a lot of 
trouble. 

We constantly are reminded of Lincoln when we see a replica of an old split rail fence, for he made this 
particular fence famous in about 1830. This fact will be remembered, perhaps, as long as Lincoln is. There 
is another fence which typifies the American way of life, and this is the backyard fence over which every 
wife gossips, or has been noted for gossiping for generations. 

All over the world we find fences; there are different types in different countries, as in England, where 
hedges take the fence's place. In Spain and Italy the ornately carved iron fence borders practically every 
street, and in France a picket fence is a common sight. 

Today's fence dates back to Roman days and perhaps before, when they were used to assure privacy. In 
outdoor gardens high walls were built just as people in thickly populated areas today boast high fences. Of 
course the idea of caging animals with fences originated even before the founding of Rome, for even primitive 
man caged and tamed beasts to work for him, just as we cage and fatten or train animals today. 

Fences save lives every day by keeping people from rushing before oncoming trains and getting in the way 
of working construction tools which might accidently injure or kill you. Snow fences prevent drifts from 
covering our ever expanding network of roads, and this is very important to the life of the traveling man, and 
in emergencies these fences, by keeping the road clear, might save the life of a person being rushed to the 
hospital. 

Next time you try to crawl under Farmer Brown's barbed wire fence to steal blueberries, or you go picking 
mayflowers and leave Farmer Black's pasture gate open, or you jump over Aunt Mary's little white picket fence 
and stamp on her flowers, or you sneak past the sign saying "keep out" to see what that noisy steamshovel is 
digging, or Halloween night you are tempted to paint the cathedral's black iron fence spokes red, or on a 
dull winter's night you have nothing to do but knockdown snow fences, remember before going any further; the 
fence is there for the purpose of saving lives, or perhaps it's there to beautify your community, or perhaps it 
is keeping your next meal within consuming distance. 

Whatever its purpose a fence is an asset to anyone's property if it's styled to fit the environment. Your 
countryside would look barren; your food would roam away; your community would show its cluttered alleys 
and dumps, and your curious neighbors might get injured or even killed without the fence. 

Don't pass the significance of the fence off lightly. I know that if ever I have a house of my own, I most 
certainly will have a fence around my yard, bordering my garden and any other place I can find room to put 
one. I love 'em. 

Connie Packard 



REFLECTION OF A POOR FISH 

Sure came off cold didn't it? And just when I thought spring was here. There must be about two or three 
inches of ice up there now- -makes it kind of dark down here too. Here come the kids skating; I won't get 
a minute's peace until the ice melts. Gee, but it's cold, and there are supposed to be three more weeks of it. 

Say, that boy up there looks suspicious. He's chopping a hole in the ice. I think he sees me; wonder what 
he's going to do with that stick? Wow! That was close! Doesn't he know that it's against the law to spear 
fish? Guess I'd better head for deeper water: the channel ought to be a safe place. 

It's a deep, dark place down here, but it's the safest spot in the river. Not as deep as it used to be though. 
Fills in more and more every year. I wonder if it will ever get completely filled in. 

Oops- -Almost got cut on that tin can; I wish those humans wouldn't dump all that trash and rubbish in here. 
How would they like it if I dumped my refuse in their living room? Not much to eat in the winier; there goes 
a beetle--got him; umm, not bad. June bugs are a lot better though--can't wait till June. 

Say, those children shouldn't skate over the channel- -it's not safe. I knew it! One of them fell through. 
Where did all those people come from all of a sudden? Well, well, the fire department. Now one of the fire- 
men has fallen through. When will they ever learn? That's funny, the boy finally had to save the fireman. 
What a fuss they make when someone gets a ducking. That will probably make the front page on the news- 
paper tomorrow. 

Just think, Spring in a few more weeks! But then I'll have to begin worrying about those confounded fish- 
ermen. They caught grandpa last summer, you know. I told him he should get his glasses changed; but no, he 
had to go and eat his dinner without even making sure it was safe. We warned him, but it was too late. Well 
I suppose we all have to go sometime- -but I hope, if I get caught, it will be on something more ingenious 
than a nightcrawler. What an inglorious way to die! 

What with the weather changing from too cold to too hot, and these insane fishermen to contend with, the 
old world is coming to a sorry state. Just like Grandpa used to say, "If it isn't one thing, it's two". 

Well, so long, see you in the frying pan. 

Frank Smith "53 



26 





^0- 



mfm 





Seated, left to right: David Heath, Elson Hathaway, Sondra 
Black, Alice Hathaway, Philip Bowie. Second row: Rolfe 
Bryant, Edward Merritt, Ruth McAvoy. At the piano: Joan 
Culver. 




CHORUS 



Boys, front to back: Larry Sherk, Ramon Sears, Frank Smith, 
Richard Purrington, Edward Merritt, Richard Ferreira, Bruce 
Purrington, Richard Houghton, in back, Raymond Rice, John 
Warner. Girls, Front row, left to right: Mary Smart, Janet 
Vayda, Alison Sharpe, Marilyn Pearl, Alice LaCass. Second 
row; Helen Baldwin, Jane Beals, Patricia Evans, Constance 
Packard, Ellen Ames, Julia Kolosewicz, Eileen O'Brien. Gail 
Papineau, Joan Damon, Mary Graves, Barbara Cumm, Ruth 
McAvoy, Jacqueline Morin, Nancy Bickford, Nancy Outhuse, 
Karyl Ronka. Third row; Mary Baker, Beverly Richardson, 
Anne Ice, Linda Sanderson, Yvonne Dufresne, Carole Harlow, 
Nancy Brewer, Donna Shumway, Lois Mollison, Mary Jane 
Curtis, Jean Tiley, Alice Nugent, Dorothy Hillenbrand. 




28 




PRO MERITO 



Standing left to right: John Warner, Harry Pomeroy, Richard 
Houghton, Nancy Bickford, Sidney Nichols, Edward Merritt, 
Frank Smith, Ramon Sears, James Johnson. Seated: Miss Anne 
T. Dunphy. 





PLAY CAST 




Seated left to right: Lois Mollison, Eileen O'Brien, Joan Da- 
mon. Standing left to right: Paul Harlow, Richard Ferreira, 
Harry Pomeroy, Sidney Nichols, Sarah Adams, Elson Hathaway, 
Sylvia Nye, Eugene Penfield, Joan Culver, Bruce Purrington, 
Nancy Bickford, Mary Graves. 



29 





FORENSIC 



Seated left to right, first row: Richard Houghton, Harry Pomeroy, Sarah 
Adams, Anthony Soltys. Second row: Miss Barbara J. Troisi, Bruce 
Purrington, Joan Culver, Nancy Bickford, Jacqueline Morin. At the 
rostum: John Warner. 



The Forensic League 
orgainized this year with 
John Warner as president, 
Sally Adams as vice-presi- 
dent, and Richard Houghton 
as secretary. Our new 
coach and advisor was Miss 
Barbara J. Troisi who gave 
willingly of her time and 
contributed much to the 
success of the year. 

The year opened with a Practice 
Tournament at Northampton to which 
we sent 6 teams. During the year, 
our number of interested debators 
dropped to 3 teams. 

The Varsity Affirmative was up- 
held throughout the year by Richard 
Houghton and Harry Pomeroy while 
Sally Adams and John Warner main- 
tained the negative position. Out of 
12 debates we won 7 and lost 5. This 
ranked us 3rd in a league of 7 
schools. Our chapter membership 



in the National Forensic League is 
threatened this year. In order to 
maintain membership a chapter must 
have 30 new members or degrees. 
We have a shortage that we are try- 
ing to make up, and we hope to be 
able to keep the charter for Burgy. 
Williamsburg Chapter is the oldest 
chapter in New England, and it seems 
a pity that it might possibly lose its 
charter. 

The main reason for this is an 
antipathy upon the part of the stu- 
dents where Debating and the other 
forensic activities are concerned. It 
seems that more than 6 students from 
the whole school shouldbe interested 
in these activities enough to remain 
throughout a whole year. We sin- 
cerely hope that next year's debators 
will find a student body which is more 
interested in the Forensic work for 
which Williamsburg Chapter has been 
known statewide , and even nationally. 



30 




GLEE CLUB 



Boys, front to back: Frank Smith, Raymond Rice, Edward Merritt, Richard Ferreira, Bruce Purrington, 
Richard Houghton. First row, left to right: Jacqueline Morin, Nancy Bickford, Barbara Cumm. Sec- 
ond row: Joan Damon, Patricia Evans, Julia Kolosewicz, Ellen Ames, Constance Packard, Mary Graves, 
Ruth McAvoy, Nancy Outhuse. Third row: Jane Beals, Donna Shumway, Gail Papineau, Lois Molli- 
son, Mary Jane Curtis, Jean Tiley. At the piano: Joan Culver. 



For those who like singing, the 
glee club is one of the most important 
school activities. Practicing the songs 
for the Musical Festival and graduation 
used up many precious study periods 
but -- . 

This year the Musical Festival was 
held in Athol. Many found it a novel 
experience and fully enjoyed it, even 
the two and a half hour bus ride! 

Our audition was held in the Baptist 
Church. The glee club sang "Raining" 
and "The Beautiful Blue Danube." 

Watching other groups audition also 
proved enlightening as well as enter- 
taining. 

The high point of the day was the 
massed chorus held in the Methodist 



Church. 

Here the students from all the 
representative schools were rehearsed 
by Professor Gilday from Framingham 
Teachers College and then gave a con- 
cert which was broadcast. Among the 
selections sung were "The Lost Chord" 
and "Battle Hymn of the Republic." 

The glee club's contribution to class 
night was "Strumming" and "Come 
Spring," and on graduation night they 
sang the two songs sung at the Festival 
audition. 

Although much time was spent in 
practicing the pleasure and satisfaction 
received made the effort more than 
worthwhile . 



31 






GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

First row, seated: Ellen Jane Ames, Nancy Outhuse, Mary 
Graves, Jane Beals, Joan Culver, Joan Damon. Second row: 
Donna Shumway, Constance Packard, Nancy Curtis, Sondra 
Black, Carole Harlow, Alison Sharpe. 



GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM 



In spite of the many handicaps our girls' team 
had to put up with, they still did a wonderful job with 
a record of four wins, ten losses, and one tie. 

The handicaps that the girls had to put up with 
were numerous -- just let me run through some of 
them. 

Starting a team without a coach isn't exactly 
easy, but while they were practicing in the town hall 
three afternoons a week, Miss Troisi was good enough 
to give up her time and stay with the girls because 
an adult had to be present while the girls used the 
town hall. 

Finally the girls got a coach, Mr. Cate, and with 
his coaching they had more confidence. However, 
because of his health, Mr. Cate was unable to con- 
tinue. Again despair came, but not for long, because 
soon the girls had someone to take Mr. C ate 's place. 
Mrs. Kmit voluntered to take the girls' team until 
the end of the season. Under her supervision, the girls 
showed a renewal of spirit. 

Many of the girls showed marked improvement 
in their playing this year. The outstanding performer 
of the season was Mary Graves, a fast forward, who 
showed excellent marksmanship. There are many 
Freshman girls who promise to become good players 
in the future. 



With constant practice, good coaching, and better 
facilities the girls' teams in the future should prove 
to be on a level with other high ranking teams. 



Games: 


Opponent 


Williamsburg 


Charlemont 


28 


19 


New Salem 


19 


17 


Powers 


26 


7 


Charlemont 


23 


17 


Hopkins 


45 - 


13 


Sanderson 


36 


14 


Huntington 


19 


38 


Powers 


32 


13 


Smith School 


34 


34 


Sanderson 


17 


9 


New Salem 


5 


10 


Smith School 


27 


26 


Huntington 


50 


43 


Hopkins 


31 


33 


Huntington 


19 


35 



33 




CHEERLEADERS 



Left to right: Jeannine Bernier, Ellen Jane Ames, Joan Culver, Sylvia 
Nye (Captain), Nancy Outhuse, Barbara Derouin, Helen Baldwin. 



CHEERLEADERS 

During the basket- 
ball season the cheer- 
leaders led the enthusi- 
astic fans in cheering for 
the home team. 

At first, they felt 
rather discouraged 

wearing their old uni- 
forms and cheering the 
old cheers, but the gen- 
erosity of 'the Women's 
Club made it possible for 
the cheerleaders to show 
up at the tournament in 
snappy new uniforms. 

Again credit is due 
Mrs Kmit for giving her 
time and effort to help 




improve the cheers and 
routines. The good dis- 
play made at the tourna- 
ment by the cheerlead- 
ers was largely her 
doing. 

With three new 
cheerleaders and four 
old timers, it was quite 
an easy job to get the 
new ones in step with the 
others. Jeannine Bern- 
ier, Ellen Jane Ames, 
and Helen Baldwin, the 
three new cheerleaders , 
caught right on to the 
routine and proved to 
know their work. 



34 




BOYS' BASKETBALL 



Seated left to right: Ramon Sears, Bernard Bachand, Frank 
Smith, John Dymerski, Robert Clark, Paul Harlow. Standing 
left to right: Coach Earl Tonet.Elson Hathaway, James John- 
son, Eugene Penfield, Peter Shumway, Manager Richard Pur- 
rington. 



Coach Earl Tonet had another 
good season with his basketball team. 
The team scored a total of 740 points 
to their opponent's 557. This is an 
average of about 50 points per game 
to the opposing teams' 37. The team 
had a good season winding up the 
regular schedule with a 9 win-5 loss 
record. After the season they were 
fortunate in getting an invitation to 
the Amherst Small School Tourna- 
ment, where they were defeated by 
the high-spirited Monson High School 
team. This brought Burgy's record 
down to 9-6 which is not too bad for 
a small high school. As has been the 
past few years, they had good cheer- 
ing support from the townspeople. 



PLAYERS AND POSITION 





G. 


B. 


F. 


T. P. 


Ave. per game 


Penfield, c. 


15 


82 


41 


205 


13.66 


Smith, g. 


15 


55 


17 


127 


8.46 


Sears, f. 


14 


54 


18 


126 


9.00 


Bachand, g. 


15 


40 


13 


93 


6.20 


Clark, f. 


13 


26 


8 


60 


4.61 


Hathaway, f. 


13 


25 


9 


59 


4.54 


Dymerski, f. 


12 


20 


5 


45 


3.75 


Shumway, c. 


9 


7 


3 


17 


1.9 


Johnson, g. 


9 


8 





16 


1.8 


Harlow, f. 


6 





1 


1 


.17 



Charlemont 

Alumni 

New Salem 

Powers 

Charlemont 

Clarke 

Williston J. V. 

Sanderson 

Huntington 

Powers 

Clarke 

Sanderson 

New Salem 

Huntington 

Monson 




Opp. 
16 
37 
23 
34 
38 
41 
30 
43 
60 
21 
43 
58 
27 
51 
35 



Burgy 
66 
56 
47 
70 
45 
40 
43 
38 
30 
56 
72 
34 
64 
32 
29 



35 





BASEBALL 



First row, left to right; Paul Harlow, Mandy Smith, John 
Dymerski, Ramon Sears, Frank Smith, Robert Clark, Russell 
Leonard. Second row: Elson Hathaway, Eugene Penfield, 
Richard Braman, Peter Shumway. Standing: Coach Earl Tonet 
and Manager Richard Houghton. 



We started off our practice sessions with a small 
team, in size as well as number. Our players were 
young and inexperienced, and it took a couple of 
games to wear off the nervousness. After losing our 
first two games, due to poor fielding and weak hitting, 
we settled down to win six straight before going down 
to our second defeat at the hands of Saint Michaels. 
Our three losses may be in some ways credited to our 
weak hitting and unsettled infield. We had a fairly 
stable pitching staff, both pitchers ending up with the 
same percentage. Clark's best game was a one -hitter 
against Belchertown while Penfield's best were his 
two-hitter against Hopkins and his three -hitter against 
Hopkins and his three-hitter against Sanderson. In 
the Clarke School game they combined efforts to pitch 
another three-hitter. Clark's wins came from his slow 
curve and almost perfect control while Penfield relied 



on his fast ball and side arm inshoot. Together with 
the fine pitching and clutch hitting of Hathaway, the 
team produced one of the best records in recent years. 



WHS 3 7 Hopkins J. V. 

WHS 5 6 St. Michaels 

WHS 6 Williston J. V. 

WHS 5 3 Sanderson Academy 

WHS 5 4 Hopkins J. V. 

WHS 7 1 Clarke School 

WHS 5 3 Sanderson Academy 

WHS 4 Belchertown 

WHS 1 2 St. Michaels 



4 H. 

12 H. 

9 H. 

3 H. 

2 H. 

3 H. 
6 H. 
1 H. 
6 H. 



Player 

Hathaway 

Penfield 

Clark 

Smith 

Sears 

Shumway 

Braman 

Harlow 

Dymerski 

M. Smith 

Leonard 



Position 

CF-1B 

C-P 

P-1B 

SS 

3B-C 

LF 

RF 

2B-CF 

2B-3B 

RF 

2B 



G 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
8 
9 
9 
9 
2 
3 



AB 
33 
32 
34 
27 
34 
23 
32 
23 
26 
3 




R 
11 

6 
3 
5 
3 
5 
3 
3 
2 





H 

12 
10 
9 
7 
8 
5 
5 
3 
3 




2B 3B TB 



1 
1 

1 













18 
12 
9 
7 
8 
8 
6 
3 
4 





RBI 

8 



4 

1 

3 

1 

3 

4 

2 







SB BB Pet. 



5 
4 
3 
9 
2 
2 
2 
4 



1 
4 
2 
12 
2 
4 
4 
9 
3 



.364 
.313 
.265 
.259 
.235 
.217 
.156 
.130 
.115 



.000 
.000 



36 





'Cheer for old Burgy." 



Harlow's only point 






Burgy vs. Monson at Tourney 




Tipoff for Clare School game. 




'Nobody gets in without paying. 






"Anybody seen the basketball?" 





"Don't trip over the Charlemont 
spectators." 




'Hey, time's up!" 




Game with Huntington 



Burgy's Valley Forge 



"Look out, Powers, that's Big Gene 
shooting. 



37 




Winding up for the bunt. 




Watch those seams! Uniforms cost money. 




Ah, what form! 






"Next time !' 




Mixed emotions 



T8 




Literary Editors 



Faculty Advisors 



39 




Orchestra playing a medley of songs 



Joan: "Nan, look at that judge." 



Parade at Music Festival 






Glee Club practicing 



Burgy's soloist, Sylvia Nye 



Others views of Glee Club 





WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 
presents 

'THIS IS THE LIFE" 

A comedy in three acts 



Play by 
Robert Ray 



Directed by 
Leo Parent 



THE CAST 
(In order of appearance) 

Mrs. Busby, a deaf woman Sally Adams 

Etta Bingham, a boarding house keeper Lois Mollison 

Harold Carter, a male milliner Bruce Purrington 

Katie Clark, alias Kathryn Clarkson Nancy Bickford 

Sadie Williams, alias Sari Wilitski loan Damon 

Sam Hinds, a floorwalker at Ralston's Eugene Penfield 

Sehor Oliver, a Spanish hotel manager Richard Ferreira 

Little Pine, an Indian bellhop Paul Harlow 

Martha Ralston, a society matron Eileen O'Brien 

Oscar Ralston, of The Ralston Brothers Elson Hathaway 

Melissa Lander, a movie star Silvia Nye 

Julie, her French maid Joan Culver 

Feodor Wilitski, a Russian director Harry Pomeroy 



STAGING STAFF FOR 'THIS IS THE LIFE" 

Faculty Advisor Miss Barbara Troisi 

Stage Manager Norman Tiley 

Business Manager John Warner 

Properties Peter Shumway, Richard Purrington, R. Houghton 

Tickets Helen Baldwin, Jeannine Bernier, 

Edward Merritt, R. A. McAvoy 

Lighting Richard Purrington 

Publicity Gail Papineau 

Prompters Sidney Nichols, Mary Graves 



SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

Ac; One: 

The sitting room in Mrs. Bingham's boarding house in Los 
Angeles, California. September. 

Act Two: 

"The Desert Inn", Palm Springs, California. November. 

Act Three: 

The same. A week later. 




41 



CLASSES 




Testing drivers' ability 



A "very" informal discussion. 



42 



AND ASSEMBLIES 





A food sale 





Debate with Holyoke 



.and furthermore. 






Junior Christmas Party 



"That's how my wife 
drives." 



Mr. Branch cutting up. 




Memorial Day assembly: 
Richard Houghton. . . 





.Nancy Bickford. 




"Good job, Jake." 




John Warner reciting. 




Mrs. Kmit awarding cer- 
4 3 tificates. 




Mary Jane reading her 
essay. 



THE SENIOR CLASS'S 






The "Big Town" 





1 



"Oh, Maid, the beds aren't 
made yet." 



"Our room has a fine 
view." 



Ijwfp 





"But where do they keep 
their cows?" 



On terra ferma again. 



On the "Sightseer" headed 
down the Hudson. 



The First Mate and the 
Quartermaster. 





"All's well, Captain, ex- 
cept Ed." 



The United Nations Build- 
ing 



"Land ho, Mate, off the 
Port bow." 






"You said it! 



The next day QUEENS. . 



. . .La Guardia Airport. 






.and another party! 



44 



Starting for home (and Ed). 



"Put those towels back, 
Norm." 



NEW YORK TRIP 






Where Norm, Jake and Looking down from Rocke- What they saw: iceskat- 

Gene stayed. feller Plaza. ing. . . 



.and the skyscrapers. 







"Captain, the ship's 
sinking." 



WILLIAMSBURG Bridge 





A rough cruise, but Lois 
feels fine. 




"Nothing like sight 
seeing. . . 

EL /F 



. . .and a party, after- 
wards." 





.and planes. 



.Chinatown. 



. . ."The QUEEN ELIZA- 
BETH. . . 




"I don't wanna go home." 




Just reminiscing. 




PICNIC 




"Where'd all that dirt 
come from?" 




BJilltamsburtj Hit?!) J&rrjool 



Waiting for the food to 
come. 



Class JCtgljt Exercises 



Processional 
Address of Welcome 

Class History 
Music — Strumming 

Class Prophecy 
Prophecy on Prophet 
Music— To Spring 



President Class of '52 



Glee Club 



Glee Club 



Harry Pomeroy 

John Warner 
Harry Woods 

Harry Pomeroy 
Eileen O'Brien 
Gladys P.lcher 



Class Will 
Class Grinds 
Presentation of Class Gift 



". . .and Chief Choo- 
Choo-Woo-Woo-Oh- 
You-Kid-Pomeroy. . . 




Acceptance or Class Gin 

President Class of '53 



Wednesday at S o'cloek 
June 18, 195: 



Richard Houghton 

Syli'ia N>c. Bruce Purnngton 

Hjrrv Pomeroy 

Ramon Sears 




". . .and nineteen bricks 
to Mr. Merritt." 



"Thanks' 



47 





'She (Class of 

1952 
UJiUkmsburj |f igh, #c«T<wl 

requests tlj c honor of Dour presence 
at th,e 

(Eamnt^nant^nt |ix*rases 

lljnrshao Aliening, 3une 19, 1952 at 8 o'clock 
Helen |E. James #cljool fftuiliing 



program 



Processional 

Invocation Reverend Charles Crist 

Oration — The Challenge to Youth — Yesterday Edward Merrttt 



Music — Raining Violets 

Glee Club 

Oration — The Challenge to Youth — Today 

Music — The Beautiful Blue Danube 

Glee Club 

Awarding of Prizes 
Presentation of Diplomas 



Daniel Protheroe 

Nancy Bickford 
Johann Strauss 



Anne T. Dunphy 
Principal 



Warren E. McAvoy 
Chairman of School Committee 



•America (first and last verses) 

Benediction 

Recessional 



Reverend Charles Crist 



* After the singing of America, the audience will remain standing for 
the Benediction and Recessional. 










Class Holl 



Sylvia Mae Nye 
Eileen Lorraine O'Brien 
Gail Patricia Papineau 
Eugene Alfred Penfield 
*Harry Francis Pomeroy 
Bruce Rollo Purrington 
Peter Bartlett Shumway 
Norman Jenkins Tiley 
•John Maynard Warner 




Sara Ruth Adams 
Helen May Baldwin 
Jeannine Alice Bernier 
*Nancy Isabelle Bickford 
Joan May Damon 
Elson Willcutt Hathaway, Jr. 
•Richard Wentworth Houghton 
Ruth Anne McAvoy 
•Edward Howes Merritt 
Lois Emeline Mollison 
•Honor 



CLASS OFFICERS 

President — Harry Pomeroy 

Vice President — Eugene Penfield 

Secretary — Edward Merritt 

Treasurer — John Warner 

Historian — Sara Adams 

Class Motto — "We Learn Not For School But For Life" 
Class Colors — Maroon and Silver 
Class Flower — White Carnation 





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50 



ALUMNI NOTES 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President -- Frank Soltys 1939, Vice-President -- 
Lula Bisbee Smith 1915, Secretary -- Gordon Nash 
1930, Treasurer -- Richard Watling 1935 

Executive Committee for two years: 

Richard Culver 1941, Russell Bisbee 1941, Hazel 
Damon Warner 1915, Ruth Beebe Emrick 1942, 
Marjorie Page McKusick 1913 

Executive Committee for one year: 

Barbara Bisbee Swanda 1929, Hazel Hathaway 
Culver 1927, Cathrine Otis Merritt 1931, Jean 
Everett Hemenway 1940, Thomas Coogan 1938 

ALUMNI CLASS OF 1951 
JOAN BACHAND -- Pro-phy-lac-tic Brush Company, 
JOAN BALDWIN -- Telephone Operator, RUTH BISBEE 
-- At Home, MARILYN BLACK — Noble Manu- 
facturing Company, DOROTHY BREWER -- Berkshire 
Etching Company, AARON BROWN — Army Airforce, 
ARTHUR CLARY -- Commercial College, ALICE 
CURTIS -- Married, BARBARA DURBIN -- Employed 
at McCallum's, MURILYN GRAVES -- Oberlin Col- 
lege, JEANNE ELLEN HARLOW -- Commercial Col- 
lege. ELIZABETH HATHAWAY -- Aetna Insurance 
Company in Hartford, SHIRLEY HATHAWAY -- Pro- 
phy-lac-tic, HERBERT NYE -- Commercial College, 
LUCIA PENFIELD — Married. GILBERT SEARS -- 
University of Massachusetts, MARLENE SHAY -- Sears 
& Roebuck Company in Springfield, JANE SMITH -- 
Smith College 



MARRIAGES DURING '51-*52 
Joyce Morin 

to George Ferron 
Ruth Mollison 

to Francis Dresser 
Elizabeth Batura 

to Chester Lojko 
Mildard Shaw 

to John Barrus 
Edith Packard Stowe 

to Marshall Warner 
Alma Graves 

to Dr. Parker M. Cort 
Lucia Penfield 

to Stanley Kielbasa 



'50 

•45 

'45 

•43 
•42 

•39 
•46 

'24 
*51 



Alice Curtis 




•51 


to Russell Bisbee 




•41 


Dorothy Algustoski 




'39 


to Pufus Kneeland 


1 




Ruth Merritt 




•49 


to Robert Damon 






Wellington Graves 




'42 


to Beatrice Mann 






Robert Smith 




•47 


to Joan Gagnon 






Shirley Hathaway 




•46 


to William McGrath 




David Leduc 




•47 


to Mavis Wickland 


'42 


Norman Hathaway 




•48 


to Marjorie Lyons 


BIRTHS 




Son 


Joyce Colson Mason . . . . 
Marilyn Williams Ingellis 


'50 




.'48 


Son 


Rowena Nye Golash .... 
Vardic Golash 


•47 




•36 




Geneva Graves Warner . . . 


*43 




Eloise Bartlett Hardy . . . . 


'42 


Daughter 


Jane Bickford Montgomery , 


, '39 


Son 


Esther Clark Sena 

Arabelle Knox Fogg .... 


*3R 




•35 


Son 


Lucia Penfield Kielbasa . . 
Ruth Bowker Nye 


•si 


Son 


'46 




Harlan Nye 


'44 


Son and Daughter . 


Phyllis Damon Campbell . 


.'37 


Son 


Walter Kulash 

Robert Edwards 

Donna Hobbs Damon. . . . 
Neil Damon 


'29 


Son 


'42 


Son 


'44 




'45 


Daughter 


Marion Sylvester 


•44 




Barbara Lloyd Middendorf . 


.'39 


Son 


Palma Ingellis Wilson . . 


•48 


Son 


Betty Damon Marsh 
Alice Curtis Bisbee . . . . 


'43 


Son 


'51 






'41 


Daughter 


Wendell Pittsinger 

DEATHS 


•37 


Anna Miller Frost . . 




'06 


Wendell Clary .... 




'03 


Edward Hyde 




•99 



51 



WILLIAMS HOUSE 



FINE FOOD — CHOICE BEVERAGES 

SANDWICHES — SNACKS 

PARTIES and BANQUETS 

Dancing Nightly, with Orchestra and Song 

on Friday and Saturday Nights 

THE WILLIAMS HOUSE 

Phone Williamsburg 511 and 4191 



Robeson and Hester Bailey 



53 



Fine Cl/tss Rtngs 

/Announcements 

Yearbooks 

/lus/irds 




Since I&97 



Re pre sen t/? tire: 



CM RisK 

RO Box 1468 
Spring fee Id \ M/)S5 



54 



Compliments of 



DAILY HAMPSHIRE GAZETTE 



DIDONNA CLEANERS AND DYERS 
QUALITY CLEANING 

Tel. 323 
56 Market Street Northampton, Mass. 









DR. 0. T. DEWHURST 
OPTOMETRIST 



Tel. 184-W 



201 Main Street 



Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 

THE BOOTERY 

227 Main Street 
Northampton, Mass. 




S Basis 



Chesterfield Mass. 



^ 



(. 



' z \ 



A 



55 



Continuous 

Quality 




Co^npCoTnji^i^ Oj£/ 




^^tg£a*ri&£fr*v. *) 77a^i/ . 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE HAYDEM1LLE (OTUV 




•Ale CaQQumS 



150-154 Main Street 
42 Green Street 



Northampton 
Massachusetts 



56 









To Cover ALL Your Meeds 

KING I C US H MAN, Inc. 

259 Main Street 
Nerthampion Telephone 610 









a 



^filLt^ 






AV| Qo7?zfMJia7wnid/ cfi 



m 



^afe<* 



Chesterfield, Mass. 



&fui/ ScJurtrv Gp 



it****"? 



*** 



i»»°* 



ft?? 

Tel. 2650 



Relative Instruments 



142 Mom St. 



Northampton 



57 



iJU^Jhr^- 



Co* 1 '*" *> " e 

Class of '52 

Northampton 




Compliments of 



HATHAWAY & CULVER LUMBER 



Tel. 219 



Williamsburg, Mass. 



W>»" 5t iw St. TeV fc-W 



e 



"Congratulations to the Class of '52" 

Going into the world of industry on your own, you will need the protection that 

I sell. 

Raymond C Wisner 

Will you remember me? n • .. • , 

' Chesterfield, Mass. 

Life - Sickness — Accident - Hospitalization Tel. 2821 

Representing the North American Accident Insurance Co. 



58 



HENRY H. SNYDER INC. 



Worthington 



Worthington 2121 



Cummin gt on 2574 




G&mu 

LutfOCR 

Building M«tc<v*cs 



TeLo WrLLiflmsburg 271 

and CliEstErfiELd 2145 




Here's * M*ce 
fyr Pop/ 

Nothing is overlooked to make 
things easy for you and your fam- 
ily in the Kitchen Maid kitchens 
we plan. Even your husband has 
a place to carve in this kitchen. 
We are specialists in planning 
and installing beautiful, work-sav- 
ing kitchens personalized to your 
tastes and family requirement!. 
Drop in — let us help you. 



A 28 



a£§dQ$ 



ELECTRIC SHOP 



28 CENTER ST. PHONE 1307 

Nt - thampton, Mass. 






59 



Rtdyt 






llmtfkaAnfofais ^ajqoSJt amd ITfo&t i3£tbutUuJ> K=?urnjtfune^ 6fy*z/ 



15 BnAae StA^i 



TeX. 4200 



Tbt+Wm^iicrt' 



C F. JENKINS 

ICE CREAM - STATIONERY 
GREETING CARDS - MEDICINES 



i/^Lsaiant -Jims Jbliob 

Jewelers 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES - RINGS 

165 MAIN STREET 
N< iKTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



dar Chest 



LINENS CURTAINS DOMESTICS 



177 Main Street 
Northampton. Mass. 



314 Main Street 
Greenfield. Mass. 



Diamonds 




RDVARI1 I MPIMI1 r. r 

W.V1CHES IEVELRY 

VA'IOI REPAIRING 



I W Mini Street 



Florence. M.i-*j* IuitIN 



• .•>■-"■ 




: '..'■' ;■'.'• >-' - 1".-?*^-. ;. \':<-- 



>fl* axi»<Dffw<Dlb ale 

IRffjPAirainq 

a 

(lls(Ed (tajrs 

<=> 
J(bL428 

$ lore nee 



60 




CoSIMO Serio Re^Phar. 

Tel. 980 
65 STATE ST NORTHAMPTON 



ARTIST'S SUPPLIES 
PAINTS - WALLPAPER - GLASS 



PIERCE'S PAINT STORE 



196 MAIN ST. 



NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 



SONTAG SUNOCO STATION 



SUNOCO GAS - OIL - TIRES and 
ACCESSORIES 



Paddock's 



OS?Zsg6 





L)xute Ttlook tir &AdUy 



South Main Street 



Williamsburg 



d&t ° Z655 



7 7{a y/Jojun <ft &&&OCt 



UNITED DAIRY SYSTEM, INC 



23 Hooker Avenue 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



HAMPSHIRE 



LUMBER COMPANY 



Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON SPORTING 
GOODS CO. 









161 Main St. 



Phone 715 



-f LORENCE £TORE 

90 /IflPLE £rREET 
^//ft/riS cvnxlj3ou *S Q&rlJijsrbQ 



61 



Bill Millard 

TRANSIT- MIX CONCRETE 

WASHED SAND and GRAVEL 

ASPHALT MIX 

Northampton, Massachusetts 

"Telephones 1802 or 1054 



(f^DRP 




MOi^THATtPTON 

*\ TEL. <592 /* 




Compliments of 

MORIARTY DRUG 
PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORE 



JOHN F. MORIARTY, Reg. Pharmacist 



Florence, Massachusetts 



15 



iTHl£TlC> * 

^Street Horth^P lon 



6 J foteYSon 







G. J. MORRISON 

Prescription Optician 

163 Main - Opposite McCallum's 



Northampton's Only 
Guild Optician 



Congratulations and continual success in the 
future. This is the wish of the leading men's 
and boys' wearing apparel store in North- 
ampton. 



HARRY DANIELS 
ASSOCIATES 



62 






€= 





Pctdto ChmCcIlIC 



'P 

Norma Lee Cancjy 

92KinqIi. (Sorlhampfeoft 
Til 772 =5 



^ompt intents cf 





t/Morthampton 
/Massachusetts 






J 1 jL, 4250-1 



I 







Compliments 
of J. 

fir ten d 





Complete Tree & Lflndscwpmq 
Service 



# ti«* % 








*'*"9 St. NarthatfP**^' 

fl 



^ ^ -418 

16 (tuH5 ((ue JUorthom^ J%i$y 



63 



For the young fellow who gradu- 
ates this year we have every- 
thing that he needs for this 
important occasion. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 
NORTHAMPTON 


UPLAND FARM 

On Village Hill 

Albert, Dorothy and Peter Crone 
Williamsburg 4831 


Compliments of 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 


Compliments of 

EVAN'S SHOE REPAIR SHOP 


goto BRANDLE'S first 

To Save Time and Trouble for Your 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

Main Street Northampton 


WAR BONDS and STAMPS 
WILLIAMSBURG POST OFFICE 


Compliments of 

HERLIHY'S STORE 

76 Maple St. Florence 



64 



BERKSHIRE ETCHING CORPORATION 



Manufacturers of Nameplates 




Established 1925 



AQUADRO & CERRUTI, INC 



General Contractors 

Complete Engineering and Building 

M. Aquadro, Pres., - R. A. Aquadro, V. Pres. 
0. J. Cerruti, Treas. 

Tel. 4096-W - Office and Yard - Rear of 
Grove St. 



Best Wishes . 

FROM THE CLASS OF 
'53 

TO THE CLASS OF 
'52 



Compliments of 



PACKARD'S 
SODA SHOPPE 



65 






(Jest Chcsterfcld * 

===== Td. 2.523 



Compliments of 



EVERON P. POLLEN 



Plumbing and Heating 




©HflKITY 



c fHJIRO\IOT(L/IPE • 
" ^(DtRTIHAlMPTRDN • 




Jewelers — Engravers 

Loving Cups — Trophies 

Watchmakers 



4 Pleasant St. 
Northampton 



GmijdirrtmLs of 




cKaul - U\l or tharii pton, U nc; 



j^^icu, car-.*** 

141 9(u\9 $H-ttl "tkrrWmmjsJcn 



r-» 



(jjttqmTVLATioHb To n, QiuDu/rcmq Q^IJf °> 52 



K 






:\&&ji 








162 Main 5tRE£T 



TeL 11 



66 



PAUL ARNO MANN 


Compliments of 


Technically good and artistic 




photography for over a quarter of 
a century. 

■ 


BROOK'S GARAGE 


53 Center St. Tel. 2068 


GOSHEN, MASS. 


Compliments of 


NOBLE MANUFACTURING 


COMPANY, INC. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


NORTHAMPTON AUTO PARTS 




SCRAP IRON and METALS 


MACDONALD'S SHOE SHOP 


USED AUTO PARTS 




S. R. Shermata King St. 


185 Main Street Northampton 



67 




/%« 4 Compliments of 

JMtmm 

„ 11 HAMPSHIRE MOTOR SALES 

mERCURY ^J Sal..- Seme. 

286 King Street Northampton, Mass. 



HAYDENVILLE SAVINGS BANK 

— Deposits cere insured for the FULL AMOUNT under the laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

— Deposits draw interest from the fifteenth day of each month, 
the rate being 2/2 per cent. 

BANKING HOURS 

Monday through Friday — 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 

Friday Evenings — 6 to 8 



Compliments of 

R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 

LANDSCAPING AND TREE SERVICE 

Williamsburg 

Telephone 211 Old Goshen Road 



Compliments 0/ 

J. W. PARSONS & SON, Inc. 

REFRIGERATION SPRAYERS TRACTORS 

FARM MACHINES and SUPPLIES 

Tel. 2885 75 North King Street 

NORTHAMPTON 



68 




CompUwetttf of 




Mort-h&nfptpn 



Compliments of 



F. N. GRAVES & SONS, Inc. 



WILLIAMSBURG 



V^ompFtTtient^ of 






QoncUuidt 



on3cK *i^ar 



(^/CTT\^ CWVoJi^ P 



tr- I^i££-> 



OfiPPfarr^bur^ 




Herman 
A. 



Tel i4-Z6 

^7-^9 PLeTA^ANT fi y^QRTHAHP\ON 



Compliments of 

The 
WILLIAMSBURG BLACKSMITHS 



69 



Compliments of 

HILLSIDE ORCHARD 


COLONIAL CLEANERS 

Quality Cleaning — Dyeing 

Weekly Pickup — Delivery Service 

CARL SYLVESTER 

Tel. 247 
4 Main Street Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

R. F. BURKE 

Williamsburg, Massachusetts 


Compliments of 

O'BRIEN'S PAINT SHOP 

Phone 4751 
HAYDENVILLE 


HERBS and ANNUALS 

CHOICE PERENNIALS 

For Rock Garden and Border 

HOUSE PLANTS 

VILLAGE HILL NURSERY 

Williamsburg, Massachusetts 


W. N. POTTER 
GRAIN STORES, Inc. 

WIRTHMORE FEEDS 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 

Northampton, Mass. Tel. 228 


Compliments of 

WILLIAMSBURG 
GENERAL STORE 

MEATS - GROCERIES - DRY GOODS 

GAS & ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

SHOES - BOTTLED GAS 

Phone 294 Williamsburg 


EXPERT RADIO REPAIR 
PROMPT SERVICE 

FRANCIS DRESSER JR. 

Goshen, Mass. Tel. Williamsburg 4895 



70 



Compliments of 

JONES THE FLORIST 

Haydenville, Massachusetts 
Tel. 4331 - 4333 


Compliments of 

MARIE'S GOSHEN INN 


Compliments of 

GEORGE L BARRUS & SONS 

General Farming 
Wood Lumber Maple Products 

Goshen, Mass. 
Tel. Williamsburg 3862 or 3866 


Compliments of 

LINCOLN HOWES 

Representative 
Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Cummington, Mass. 


CHILSON'S SHOPS 

W. Leroy Chilson 

Furniture Covering and Upholstery Supplies 
Awning — Venetian Blinds - Combination Storm Windows and Screens 
Furniture Upholstering - Window Shades 
Automobile Plate and Safety Glass — Truck Coverings and Canvass Goods 
Slip Covers — Cushions - Auto Tops and Upholstering 

34 Center Street — Northampton 


Congratulations to the Graduates 

FINES ARMY NAVY STORE 

37 Main Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

KING'S PAINT & PAPER STORE 

157 Main Street Northampton 



71 



0> 



lf« 



1 



(38 PIeasANT ST. 




^gr 



Dodge 




Plymouth 



Tel. 3092 

NoPT HAMPTON, VI ASS. 



Compliments of 



CARL'S APPAREL SHOP 



11 No. Maple St. 



Fl 



orence 



Compliments of 



CALLAHAN'S 5 & 10 STORE 



81 Main St. 



Florence 



CAREER TRAINING 

Our college-grade courses provide young men and women with the necessary back- 
ground for successful careers in business, educational, governmental, and pro- 
fessional organizations. Following are representative offices where our recent 
graduates hold Secretarial, Accounting, and Junior Executive positions: 



Medical 

Legal 

School and College 

Aircraft 

Civil Service 



Insurance 

Banking 

Advertising 

Hotel 

Shipping 



General Manufacturing 

Accounting 

Merchandising 

Sales 

Foreign Service 



Founded 1896 NORTHAMPTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE Northampton, Mass. 



yVoool & jtratid 

Jezvelers 

Northampton 
ZVatcke.5 
d^lqin Houmillon 

Sulova Tjdittn&ucr 

Xoncjined Ome^Ct 

Divioto Payments 



Compliments of 



W. E. KELLOGG & SON 



DAIRY and POULTRY PRODUCTS 



Tel. 3631 



Williamsburg 







72 



Compliments of 




WILLIAMSBURG 


Best Wishes To 


GENERAL STORE 


CLASS OF '52 


MEATS - GROCERIES - DRY GOODS 




GAS & ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 




SHOES - BOTTLED GAS 


Williamsburg 




Fuel & Ice Co. 


Phone 294 Williamsburg 






Compliments of 


Compliments of 


HENRY M. KUGLER & SON 


GUSETTI'S 






Northampton, Massachusetts 


Compliments of 






HAYDENVILLE BUTTON COMPANY 


PIERCE'S STORE 


Incorporated 




Manufacturers of 




Pearl Buttons and Novelties 


Goshen, Massachusetts 


Haydenville, Mass. 


HERBIE'S SERVICE STATION 


HELEN WOODS 


Mobilgas Lubrication 






Lamps and Lampshades 


H. A. Mongue 


Original copyright designs 


Berkshire Trail 
Cummington, Massachusetts 


160 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 



73 



E. C ADDIS & CO. 

PLUMBING - HEATING 
Electrical Supplies — Pittsburg Paints 
Hardware and Varnishes 

Tel. 3099W 
42-46 Maple Street Florence, Mass. 


All Kinds of 
ROUGH and FINISHED LUMBER 
LATHE DOWELS BANDSAWING 

PACKARD BROTHERS 

Goshen Tel. Williamsburg 3404 


M. 1. O'CONNOR 

General Contractor 

Northampton, Massachusetts 


Compliments of 

SINCAGE PRINTING 


LAUNDRY CENTER 

35 State St. 
Northampton, Massachusetts 

Tel. 329 


HAMPSHIRE SERVICE CO. 
FRIGIDAIRE AND DELCO PRODUCTS 

202 STATE STREET 
Northampton, Massachusetts 

Telephone 505-W 



74 



^Patrons 

TTfrort Tffo tcobert i3 'ranch 1<Tlr o*d TTlrs Xcon Sonderson 
Iflr. o„d ???rs 1°h,/,p Corno/I ~Tf7r and Tftrs 7/loms X Sender 
iTks. o^d ~7??r idchard Clausen Tftr. a,xl 1ftrs. G Xe/or>d Smith 
V?2r i&yer 7?. Cope /and l71r ond /%-5. Uuqo Sicmberq 
Tfftss 79hr#ra J)icKermart 1fc o*d Iftn. lOof/er i? tXbayer 
7/oss We/en Ar-aKe 7ft r. Xeon GL J7leij 
Tflibs Gnne \X fiutipby 7ft r andTftrs. Gurt Uonet 
7??r. and l77rs. \J l red Gnnnell Tftr. and Tftrs Narnj Uower 
fib: "Phihp C. Gurney 7fttz>s 73orbara. ) Uroisi 
J3r. and fftn- GxXrancis Osbom fftr ard Tftrs ^Syonk 1/ouJa 
TtlK Gero/d iftrter 7ftf W 17 fa. i?ocfmor?d Warner 

Contributors 

M55 Xena iSreyuet 7/2r Trounce JenkfnS 
Tftr Xuaus <f sJenfahs Xt. TTlrz. XLecn Q ^Jtlejj 






Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON 
RADIATOR WORKS 

346 King St. - Tel. 2204-W 


Compliments of 

REARDON BROS. 

HAYDENVILLE 


COHfll BROS c 

.... 




ttfemSt-TiL mo- N. 


>r thorn p+on, Ho*v 


Compliments of 

J. R. MANSFIELD & SON 
FUNERAL HOME 

South Main Street Hay den vi lie 


&St lOishcs 

"From -Hl£ 

(Class o* 55 


Compliments of 

MORIN'S BARBER SHOP 

Haydenville, Mass. 


Compliments of 

THE BEE HIVE STORE 

SHOES - CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS 
29 Main Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

SILAS SNOW FARM 


34-t KING ST. 
GASOLINE -• HEAXIN6 OltS 


JQJs Q " d Shoes 

d^-J CLEANED a+ 

MfiRlZZfS 

13 K«NG S+r£€ + 


Compliments of 

S. A. HEALY AND SONS 

West Chesterfield 


j. f. McAllister 

ESSO SERVICENTER 

Gasolines - Motor Oil — Tires 

Batteries - Accessories 
Route 9 Haydenville 


Compliments of 

BEAVER BROOK 

POULTRY FARM 

LEEDS, MASS. 


Co7nf>timent of 


Compliments of 

CHUCK'S RADIO SHOP 

Haydenville, Mass. 




Co™pl\m£»nVs o£ 

r* GoswEM 


SMITH GLASS & MIRROR 
CO- 

84 PLEASANT ST. 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 





75 




76